26 June 2015

goat is vuhutz (revisited)

vuhutz = goat (noun) (Some things Google found for "vuhutz": a rare term; user names; a gaming character name; occurs on a number of Chinese webpages; somewhat similar Hutz is an unusual last name)

Word derivation for "goat":
Basque = ahuntz, Finnish = vuohi
Miresua = vuhutz

My previous Miresua word for goat was hauvo, which was an alphabetic scramble. This new word better resembles both the Basque word and the Finnish word.

The word goat doesn't occur in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, but it occurs three times in Through the Looking-Glass. Alice encounters a number of talking animals in Through the Looking-Glass.
A Goat, that was sitting next to the gentleman in white, shut his eyes and said in a loud voice, "She ought to know her way to the ticket-office, even if she doesn't know her alphabet!"

22 June 2015

lion is leijo (revisited)

leijo = lion (animal) (noun) (some things Google found for "leijo": an unusual to uncommon term; a rare last name that can be Finnish or can be Hispanic; a rare first name; user names; name of a NPC collector character in GuildWars; Leijo is a bathroom supply store in Pontevedra, Spain; similar Leija is the name of a place in Mexico)

Word derivation for "lion" :
Basque = lehoi, Finnish = leijona
Miresua = leijo

My previous Miresua word for lion was lehoni. I redid this word, made it shorter and used the J to make it different. Note J in Miresua is pronounced like Y. A better mix of the Basque and the Finnish words would have been leiho, but leiho means window in Basque.

The word lion does not occur in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, but it occurs nearly twenty times in Through the Looking-Glass. This quote is an old song or nursery rhyme which Alice repeats to herself. It was not written by Lewis Carroll, it's older.
"The Lion and the Unicorn were fighting for the crown:
The Lion beat the Unicorn all round the town.
Some gave them white bread, some gave them brown;
Some gave them plum-cake and drummed them out of town."

18 June 2015

wing is sigal (revisited)

sigal = wing (noun) (some things Google found for "sigal": a common term; SIGAL Construction Corporation of the Washington DC area; an unusual to uncommon last name; a unusual often feminine first name that can be Isreali; David Sigal Jewelry; SIGAL is an insurance company in Albania; in Armenian (transliterated) sigal means to strut, to walk in a proud manner; name of an ancient Sakastan city in present day southwest Afghanistan; name of a place in Cameroon)

Word derivation for "wing" :
Basque = hegal, Finnish = siipi
Miresua = sigal

My previous Miresua conlang word for wing was heipi, from earlier this year. Nothing wrong with the mix of that word, I just didn't like it. I have lots of words ending in I, so I'd rather end the word in L.

I found one occurrence of the plural word wings in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.
...a sharp hiss made her draw back in a hurry: a large pigeon had flown into her face, and was beating her violently with its wings.

14 June 2015

sheep is ladis (revisited)

ladis = sheep (noun) (Some things Google found for "ladis": a common term; an unusual to uncommon unisex first name; unusual last name; LADIS is an acronym for Large Scale Distributed Systems and Middleware which is professional workshop conference; Dimensional Demonic Dragon, Ladis the Tyrant is a monster card in Future Card BuddyFight card game; LADIS is an acronym for Legislation and Development Information Systems which is an Egyptian IT solutions company; name of a place in Tyrol, Austria)

Word derivation for "sheep" :
Basque = ardi, Finnish = lammas
Miresua = ladis

Earlier this month I posted aras as my Miresua word for sheep. Somehow that just didn't seem to be the right mix of letters. So I've redone the word for sheep, again.

The word sheep occurs once in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, I quoted that earlier this month. In Through the Looking-glass the word sheep appears around twenty times.
Alice rubbed her eyes, and looked again. She couldn't make out what had happened at all. Was she in a shop? And was that really -- was it really a SHEEP that was sitting on the other side of the counter?

10 June 2015

cow is lehi (revisited)

lehi = cow (animal) (noun) (some things Google found for "lehi": a common term; Lehi is a prophet from the Book of Mormon; Lehi was a 1940s Jewish/Zionist militant group; Lehi or Ramath Lehi was a biblical place in Judah where Samson killed a thousand Philistines with the jawbone of a donkey; an unusual masculine first name; an unusual to last name; name of a community in Arizona; name of a city in Utah; name of places in Arkansas and Indonesia)

Word derivation for "cow" :
Basque = behi, Finnish = lehmä
Miresua = lehi

My previous Miresua word for cow was behmä. This change is so the word doesn't end in -Ä. It also simplifies the word.

This is merely a word in my conlang language, constructed as a combination of the Basque and Finnish words. It's not, in any way, intended to be a comment about or a reference to anyone or anything named Lehi.

The word cow doesn't occur in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland or Through the Looking-glass.

06 June 2015

rabbit is unki (revisited)

unki = rabbit (animal) (noun) (some things Google found for "unki": an uncommon term; Unki mine in Zimbabwe notably produces platinum; a word appearing in Hindi song titles such as "Yeh Dil Aur Unki, Nigaaho Ke Saaye"; an unusual last name; an unusual to rare first name; in Hindi when transliterated unki seems to mean their; name of a place in Zimbabwe)

Word derivation for "rabbit":
Basque = untxi, Finnish = kani
Miresua = unki

My previous Miresua conlang word for rabbit was anuki. I revised this word to start with U, like the Basque word, and also shortened the word.

The word rabbit appears many times in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.
So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.

02 June 2015

sheep is aras (revisited)

aras = sheep (noun) (Some things Google found for "aras": a very common term; Aras Corp sells product development software; a river on the international boundary between Armenia and Azerbaijan on the north and Turkey and Iran on the south; a unusual to uncommon last name; an unusual masculine first name; ARAS is an acronym for Archive for Research in Archetypal Symbolism; ARAS is a Lithuanian police anti-terrorist special operations unit; in Greek mythology Aras was an autochthon and the first king of Phliasia; ARAS Foundation where ARAS is an acronym for Acceptance, Respect, Affection, Support; ARAS dog rescue and rehoming centre in the UK; means macaws in French; means deer in Sindarin; name of places in Spain and Iran; similar Årås is the name of a place in Norway)

Word derivation for "sheep" :
Basque = ardi, Finnish = lammas
Miresua = aras

My previous Miresua word for sheep was alda. I'm redoing it so that the word doesn't end in -A. Neither the Basque word or the Finnish word ends in -A.

The word sheep occurs once in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.
So she sat on, with closed eyes, and half believed herself in Wonderland, though she knew she had but to open them again, and all would change to dull reality -- the grass would be only rustling in the wind, and the pool rippling to the waving of the reeds -- the rattling teacups would change to tinkling sheep-bells...
This Miresua word has been changed. The word for sheep is now ladis.

30 May 2015

bird is txitu (revisited)

txitu = bird (noun) (Some things Google found for "txitu": a unusual term; user names; similar txistu is a Basque fipple flute (end-blown flute) with three-holes; txitu‑ò appears in a New Testament translation in Karajá which is an indigenous language of central Brazil; similar Chitu is the name of a horse that raced in the 2014 Kentucky Derby)

Word derivation for "bird" :
Basque = txori, Finnish = lintu
Miresua = txitu

My previous Miresua word for bird was tirlu, which was an odd alphabetic scramble I constructed back in 2009. For my new word, I thought I'd let my word for bird start with TX. In Miresua, as in Basque, TX is pronounced like CH.

The word bird, plus birds, occurs a dozen times in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.
"Very true," said the Duchess: "flamingoes and mustard both bite. And the moral of that is -- 'Birds of a feather flock together.'"

"Only mustard isn't a bird," Alice remarked.

26 May 2015

dog is kotxar (revisited)

kotxar = dog (animal) (noun) (Some things Google found for "kotxar": a rare term; user names; kotxar.ru was a former sports review website; bad OCR of old text documents; similar Kotzar is an unusual last name; in Basque similar kotxe means car, auto)

Word derivation for "dog":
Basque = txakur, Finnish = koira
Miresua = kotxar

My previous Miresua word for dog was txora, which I posted way back in 2008. I'm changing this word so that it no longer ends in -A, and also because the new word is, in my opinion, a slightly better mix. In Miresua, as in Basque, TX is pronounced like CH.

The word dog, plus dogs, occurs six times in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.
"Are you--are you fond--of--of dogs?" The Mouse did not answer, so Alice went on eagerly: "There is such a nice little dog near our house I should like to show you! A little bright-eyed terrier..."

22 May 2015

those are huok

huok = those (pronoun) (demonstrative pronoun) (Some things Google found for "huok": an uncommon term; a rare last name; a rare first name; user names; in English Glossic (Ingglosh Glosik) which was a 19th century spelling system for English an added apostrophe is called hook and spelled huok; means pig in Abau which is a language of Papua New Guinea; similar Phu Huak (or Phou Huak) is a mountain in Laos; similar Huoka is a place in Yunnan, China)

Word derivation for "those":
Basque = horiek, Finnish = nuo
Miresua = huok

In Basque, the word those is a plural of that, and these is a plural of this. My Miresua words are constructed so they retain some of that similarly, but those is not a plural of that.

I found the word those ten times in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, mostly as a determiner. Perhaps I can use huok as a determiner, too.
"How doth the little crocodile
Improve his shining tail,
And pour the waters of the Nile
On every golden scale!

"How cheerfully he seems to grin,
How neatly spread his claws,
And welcome little fishes in
With gently smiling jaws!"
"I'm sure those are not the right words," said poor Alice...

18 May 2015

these is humäk

humäk = these (pronoun) (demonstrative pronoun) (Some things Google found for "humak": an uncommon term; Humak University of Applied Sciences in Finland (Finnish: Humanistinen ammattikorkeakoulu); HumAk Law students' Humanitarian Action of Norway; Humak is an unusual to rare last name; Humak is the name of a World of Warcraft character; humak means barrow in Croatian; Model Town Humak is a suburb of Islamabad, Pakistan; Humak is name of another place in Pakistan)

Word derivation for "these":
Basque = hauek, Finnish = nämä
Miresua = humäk

The ending of -k on this word makes it look sort of like a Basque plural, but unfortunately not like a Miresua plural.

The word these appears fourteen times in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, a majority of the times as a determiner. I may be able to use humäk as a determiner, too.
First came ten soldiers carrying clubs; these were all shaped like the three gardeners, oblong and flat, with their hands and feet at the corners: next the ten courtiers; these were ornamented all over with diamonds, and walked two and two, as the soldiers did.

14 May 2015

that is huo

huo = that (pronoun) (demonstrative pronoun) (Some things Google found for "huo": a very common term; a Chinese last name; Huo Yuanjia (1868-1910) was a Chinese martial artist; with pinball machines HUO is an acronym for Home Use Only; in World of Warcraft Huo is the Spirit of Fire, an NPC elemental character)

Word derivation for "that":
Basque = hori, Finnish = tuo
Miresua = huo

The word that appears numerous times in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, but often as a conjunction or a determiner instead of a pronoun.
Last came a little feeble, squeaking voice, ("That's Bill," thought Alice,) "Well, I hardly know -- No more, thank ye; I'm better now -- but I'm a deal too flustered to tell you -- all I know is, something comes at me like a Jack-in-the-box, and up I goes like a sky-rocket!"